II-"Prisoners of Poverty: Women wage-workers, their trades and their lives" - Helen Campbell - New York Tribune

II-"Prisoners of Poverty: Women wage-workers, their trades and their lives" - Helen Campbell - New York Tribune

"The Case of Rose Haggerty"

by: Helen Campbell | publication date: October 31, 1886 | Publication: The New York Tribune | pages: 13

Rose earned the first month ten dollars, or two and a half a week, but being exceptionally quick, was promoted in the second to four dollars weekly. The rent was six dollars a month; and during the first one the old shoemaker came to the rescue, had an occasional eye to the children, and himself paid the rent, telling Rose to return it when she could. When the ten hours' labor ended, the child, barely fourteen, rushed home to cook something warm for supper, and when the children were comforted and tucked away in the wretched old bed, that still was clean and decent, washed and mended their rags of clothes, and brought such order as she could into the forlorn room.

In her second "Prisoners of Poverty' installment, Campbell tells the story of Rose, a fourteen-year-old girl who works at a New York bag factory to support her alcoholic parents and sickly siblings.