Clusters

You're currently browsing the full list of clusters in the database. Clusters are groups of articles that we believe go together. There are several sorts of groupings, including those by subject, series, theme, and author. If you're looking for something particular, we recommend you use the search function at the top of the page.

A 25-part Chicago Daily Times series about the abortion trade in Chicago in 1888 for which two reporters posed as a couple in search of these services.

Across the world, journalists have used undercover techniques to expose individual predators and as well as major sex crime rings.

One of the best-remembered undercover investigations of all time. Nellie Bly feigns insanity to get herself committed to the Women's Lunatic Asylum on Blackwell's (now Roosevelt) Island.

These are stings to expose scam artists, quacks and hucksters who prey on the needs or naivete of their customers, clients, or patients.

This 1960 series in the small circulation magazine, Sepia, became John Howard Griffin's best-selling book, Black Like Me.

Upton Sinclair's original serial version of "The Jungle," published in 1905 by the socialist newspaper, Appeal to Reason, edited and republished the following year by Doubleday after McMillan reneged. The newspaper serialized Sinclair's novel nearly week by week between February 25 and December 16, 1905 and offered the completion of the series in a special supplement that readers had to request separately. PDFs of the articles provided courtesy of Special Collections Pittsburg State University, Pittsburg, Kansas.

In 1992, as part of The San Francisco Chronicle's reporting on the growing crisis in the public schools and the crippling effect of California state budget cuts on education, the newspaper decided "that readers needed to understand just how dramatically the budget crisis affects the kids.

"But it would be difficult. Classroom visitors would be greeted by proud teachers putting on their best stiff-upper-lip performances, shy students and administrators complaining loudly.

Medicare and Medicaid fraud have been perennial reporting topics since the 1960s, often requiring undercover techniques to amass specific details.

As a reporter for the New York Tribune, Julius Chambers went undercover as a patient to investigate conditions at the Bloomingdale Asylum following reports of abuse at the institution.

Undercover journalism has been the subject of heated discussions, especially since the late 1970s, and whenever an undercover sting causes a stir.

The Hartford Courant's investigation of discriminatory real estate practices in Connecticut, involving reporters posed as prospective buyers in various neighborhoods. The investigation prompted a rebuttal from the newspaper's own ombudsman, Henry McNulty.

These are examples of undercover reportage that were considered to have crossed ethical lines or that caused major legal wrangles.

A collection of essays discussing the use of hidden microphones and hidden cameras from a legal, ethical and journalistic perspective.

Kit Coleman's series for the Toronto Daily Mail, cross-dressed as a tramp, reported from London's East End in 1892.

Richardson went south for the Tribune in the last days before the Civil War and reported from Louisiana under an assumed identity and coding his reports (and relaying them through other offices) to get them safely back north.

The New York World featured four women writers in their Sunday, March 16, 1980 paper.

Journalist Jan Wong changed her life for a month to see what it would be like to live with a minimum wage income. She left her husband for a month posing as a single mother and maid with two children living in a rented basement apartment.

A gathering of the undercover and experiential reporting of Elizabeth Cochrane, later Seaman, who wrote under the pen name of Nellie Bly.

Going undercover as volunteers or invited guests has gotten reporters an inside look at some U.S. political campaigns. So has shadowing the candidates in their off-hours. 

Photographers John L. Spivak and Lewis Hine captured some of the greatest moments in undercover exposes of child labor during the early 1900's.

This is the Spokane Spokesman-Review's entire archive of articles related to its office misuse investigation of Mayor Jim West in 2005, dating from the initial revelations on May 5, 2005 through his historic ouster as mayor to the Department of Justice's investigation and decision not to press charges in February 17,2006.

Wells had herself admitted to Larned State Hospital in Larned, Kansas, for an investigation of the Kansas mental health system. She stayed eight days and produced this February 1974 series for the Wichita Eagle and the Wichita Beacon.
(Special thanks to Prof. Dan Close at Wichita State University for helping to unearth and then retrieve these pieces from the Eagle microfilm.)

Emily Sachar, an education reporter for New York Newsday, quit her job as a reporter and applied for and became a full-time teacher in the New York City school system for a year, after which she wrote a series of articles about the experience and then a book.

The young reporter Vivian S. Toy's infiltration of a Milwaukee high school in her guise as a student resulted in this multipart series in 1986.

The National Enquirer conducted a submersion investigation revealing senator John Edwards' affair in 2008.

A New York Evening World series by Charles Garrett and Catherine King as they lived in total penury, looking for work, in New York City.

A digital entry for the undercover annals.

Grace Halsell went undercover to report under a number of ethnic and racial guises.

A collection of Dick J. Reavis' works pertaining to undercover journalism.

The Tribune reports on the experiences of a group of staffers who among them sponsor a total of 12 children through "four of the largest and best-known child sponsorship organizations - Save the Children, The Christian children's Fund, Children International and Childreach."

September 11 spawned some special journalistic responses, including a volunteer pose as a garbage hauler.

The Miami Herald used surveillance journalism to reveal presidential candidate Gary Hart's affair with Donna Rice.

In their Pulitzer Prize winning series, St. Petersburg Times writers Lucy Morgan and Jack Reed reveal the corruption within the Pasco County Sheriff's Department, starting with John M. Short.