Deception for Journalism's Sake: A Database

Deception for Journalism's Sake: A Database

 An undercover investigation by the Financial Times of behavior toward hostesses at The Presidents Club's annual men-only charity event in London and reaction to the story. 

In efforts to get inside the fold, reporters have fellow-traveled with religious groups, posing as members or prospective recruits.

Going undercover as volunteers or invited guests has gotten reporters an inside look at some U.S. political campaigns. So has shadowing the candidates in their off-hours. 

From 1968 to present day, reporters have gone undercover to expose the corruption and mistreatment that occurs within nursing homes.

Medicare and Medicaid fraud have been perennial reporting topics since the 1960s, often requiring undercover techniques to amass specific details.

Waste, fraud, graft, laxity, dilapidated conditions, corruption: Reporters have often used undercover tactics to investigate.

Journalism that required costuming or even physical transformation by reporters reporting on racial, ethnic, gender or social groups not their own.

Reporters have presented as teachers or students to get an inside view of what goes on in schools and colleges.