Deception for Journalism's Sake: A Database

Deception for Journalism's Sake: A Database

Waste, fraud, graft, laxity, dilapidated conditions, corruption: Reporters have often used undercover tactics to investigate.

Among the most common of poses: journalists who elect to live as tramps, the homeless, or the abject poor.

A gathering of the undercover and experiential reporting of Elizabeth Cochrane, later Seaman, who wrote under the pen name of Nellie Bly.

These are examples of undercover reportage that were considered to have crossed ethical lines or that caused major legal wrangles.

Undercover journalism has been the subject of heated discussions, especially since the late 1970s, and whenever an undercover sting causes a stir.

Across the world, journalists have used undercover techniques to expose individual predators and as well as major sex crime rings.

These are stings to expose scam artists, quacks and hucksters who prey on the needs or naivete of their customers, clients, or patients.

Going undercover as volunteers or invited guests has gotten reporters an inside look at some U.S. political campaigns. So has shadowing the candidates in their off-hours.